Angela Denny

Research Assistant

A normal day for Angela could have her attending a meeting in the morning, dissecting eels in the afternoon and consulting with student groups in the evening. Never a dull moment for UINR’s Research Assistant, Angela Denny!

In 1999, Angela was one of the first graduates from the newly-built Eskasoni High School, and she went on to continue her studies at Cape Breton University, graduating with a Bachelor of Science degree in 2006.

Right after high school Angela worked as a summer student at UINR and Eskasoni Fish and Wildlife Commision. This is where she got her feet wet working as a lab technician and assisting the biologists on a wide-range of projects.

Nowadays, Angela is involved in many projects at UINR. She represents UINR at meetings of the Bras d’Or Lakes Collaborative Environmental Planning Initiative and attends training workshops and conferences relating to Species at Risk and invasive species. Over the years, she has become expert on the American Eel and spends many hours in the lab processing eels. This month she even spent some time on the ice spearing specimens for her research. She is also involved with the Malagawatch Environmental Best Management Practices Planning Committee.

Gaspereau are another species that Angela works with every year. She processes samples in the lab, helping in the development of a management plan for the local fishery. Most recently Angela assisted in developing the series of booklets “Sespite’tmnej” (Let’s be concerned) for the protection of eel habitat, setting up workshops and community meetings for all five bands and making presentations to students.

When not working, Angie loves spending time with her two young children Bethaney and Morris, and husband, Dion Denny. When she’s not connecting with her friends on Facebook, you can probably find her out shopping or at a movie and whenever there’s a quiet moment, reading.

“The most rewarding aspect of my work is the friendly, family-like atmosphere here at UINR. I enjoy my work and it feels nice being part of a great team.”

 

Plamu/ Salmon NOTICE

Plamu/ Salmon NOTICE

January 20, 2017News, Research

Salmon returns remain critically low in most of Nova Scotia. Kelt fishing is only permitted in the Margaree River. Please refrain from fishing and/or keeping kelts (slinks, black salmon) in any other river. For more information please contact your local fisheries office.   Here’s a printable version of our poster.

Attention Unama’ki Salmon Fishers

Attention Unama’ki Salmon Fishers

January 20, 2017News, Research

Please report the river, date, and number of salmon kept between June and December, 2016 to your local fishery department by January 31, 2017. Please indicate whether retained salmon were large (63 cm or larger, 24 inches or larger) or small (less than 63 cm or 24 inches.) It’s our responsibility to report our catches … Read More

Two New Books on Oysters and Mi’kmaw Knowledge

Two New Books on Oysters and Mi’kmaw Knowledge

November 17, 2016News

Bras d’Or Lakes’ oysters have been harvested and enjoyed for thousands of years. UINR just published two new books on oysters–one, an illustrated children’s book in Mi’kmaw and English, and the other on Mi’kmaq ecological knowledge and scientific research. Both books are written by UINR’s Shelley Denny, Angela Denny, Emma Garden, and Tyson Paul. The Oyster Garden, Kiju’ … Read More

Oyster Expert Guest Speaker at Book Launch

Oyster Expert Guest Speaker at Book Launch

November 13, 2016News, Research

René Lavoie is UINR’s special guest speaker at the launch of UINR’s two new books on oysters on Wednesday, November 16, 2016 at 11:00 am at Membertou Heritage Park. Dr. Lavoie is no stranger to oysters. For nearly fifty years he has been involved in oyster management and research with DFO and Aquaculture Association of Canada. … Read More

Two New Books on Oysters Launched

Two New Books on Oysters Launched

November 7, 2016News, Research, Unama'KIDS

On Wednesday, November 16, UINR is launching two new publications on oysters–one, an illustrated children’s book in Mi’kmaw and English, and the other on Mi’kmaq ecological knowledge and scientific research. Meet the authors and hear guest speaker René Lavoie on Wednesday, November 16, 2016 at 11:00 am at Membertou Heritage Park. There will be readings, … Read More

CABIN Training 2016

CABIN Training 2016

September 30, 2016Research

The Canadian Aquatic Biomonitoring Network (CABIN) is an aquatic biomonitoring program for assessing the health of fresh water ecosystems in Canada. In Unama’ki, UINR has been working with Environment Canada to survey rivers and streams to collect, assess, and report on their health. To survey the Broad Cove River, part of the Broad Cove watershed, … Read More

How Are Plamu/Salmon Like Trees?

How Are Plamu/Salmon Like Trees?

February 24, 2016News, Research

Plamu/Salmon are a big deal at UINR and we do a lot of work to make sure they are here for future generations to enjoy. Every spring we capture young Plamu (smolt) and take a sample of their scales to do further research. Working with Ocean Tracking Network at Dalhousie University our new recruit, Emma … Read More

Managing for Seven Generations

Managing for Seven Generations

August 15, 2014News, Research

UINR’s Shelley Denny, Angela Denny and Tyson Paul are attending the 2014 Annual Conference of the American Fisheries Society in Quebec City on August 17 to 21. They are presenting our poster Managing for Seven Generations: Mi’kmaq Knowledge, Eels and the Bras d’Or Lakes during the poster presentation reception on Monday from 6:00 to 8:30 … Read More

New Research Article on Eel Parasite Published

New Research Article on Eel Parasite Published

February 12, 2013News, Research

UINR is proud to announce the publication of our first research article in the journal BioInvasions Records of the Regional Euro-Asian Biological Invasions Centre (REABIC). Distribution, prevalence and intensity of Anguillicoloides crassus in the American eel, Anguilla rostrata, in the Bras d’Or Lakes, Nova Scotia was written by Shelley K. Denny, Angela Denny and Tyson … Read More

©2016 UINR